Calm Child Formula: a recipe to calm the little ones

January 22, 2010

I currently study herbal medicine under the tutelage of Michael and Leslie Tierra and their East West School of Planetary Herbology. My focus in much of my work in herbal medicine has been maternal and child health, which you may note from many of my posts. One of the things I love about the world of herbal medicine is that the masters — our masters in this current time — are always intersecting in one way or another. The most respected herbalists of the United States are usually connected to the American Herbalists Guild (AHG), the closest thing to a regulating body that we have. It’s not easy to get AHG after your name, either!

I was looking through Naturally Healthy Babies and Children, a great resource by Dr. Aviva Jill Romm, mostly in thoughts of preparing for a course I have been dreaming about since last spring — and nodded to in a earlier post — and I came across this wonderful formula for a “Calm Child Formula“. Aviva Romm writes about it. Michael Tierra came up with it. And probably hundreds of children have been happily subjected to its calming effects. How wonderful to have a formula sanctioned by our modern masters and certainly born of a long herbal tradition of empirical evidence and experience.

The formula is a nervine, which means it has a calming effect on the nervous system, and digestive calmer, helping to bring a sense of tranquility to a child, even during times of sickness. It can be used as a tonic for active children or even during long car trips. Tierra’s company, Planetary Herbs, sells it in their formulas, or you can prepare it at home as a water-infusion or a syrup. (Ref: Romm 2003) The recipe below is for a syrup. An alternative way to make  a syrup would be to use all the same herbs and to prepare it as I describe in this post for the Herb Companion last year.

chamomile

chamomile

Calm Child Formula

1 oz. catnip tincture
1 oz. chamomile tincture
1 oz. lemon balm tincture (fresh lemon balm is superior)
1 oz. valerian root tincture (stinky!)
1/2 oz. lady’s slipper tincture
1/2 oz. hawthorn tincture
1/2 oz. vegetable glycerin

To Prepare: Combine all ingredients in a dark amber jar.
To Use: Dosage is 1/2 to 1 tsp as needed. Shake well before using.

REF: Aviva Jill Romm (2003) Naturally Healthy Babies and Children: A commonsense guide to Herbal Remedies, Nutrition, and Health. Berkeley: Ten Speed Press


Herbal Remedies Tip #9 – How to make a mustard plaster for coughs and bronchitis

January 21, 2010

mustard powder A mustard plaster? What the heck is that, you may be wondering…and even if I knew (your mind continues), wouldn’t it be messy and probably ineffective anyway? Well, I don’t know. But I like the idea of it, and I’m going to try it too! You can use a mustard plaster to bring warmth and circulation to the chest when battling persistent coughs or bronchitis. No one in my house has had a persistent cough or bronchitis in as long as my memory can stretch, but you never know. And the herbalists I trust the most, including MD Aviva Jill Romm, certainly advocate their use. As Dr. Romm indicates, the increased blood flow reduces coughing and speeds healing (Romm 2003). And yes, this is perfectly fine to use with children over three years of age. In fact, that’s who she suggests it be used for, though of course it’s useful for adults too.The only caveat is that mustard plasters must be used with those who have the ability to communicate with you if it becomes uncomfortable, so the individual must be awake and able to communicate clearly.

Aviva states that the process may seem elaborate or complicated, but after doing it once it will be simple. The relief your child will get will make it all worthwhile.

Supplies:
1/4 cup dried mustard
2 cotton kitchen towels
large bath towel
hot tap water
large bowl
warm, wet washcloth
salve or petroleum jelly

Instructions:
1. Lay out one kitchen towel on a flat surface. Spread the mustard powder onto the towel, leaving a 1 inch border around the edge uncovered. Next, fold the bottom border upward over the edge of the powder to keep the powder from following out. Place the second towel over the first one, and starting from each of the short edges, roll the edges to the center, forming a scroll.
2. Place the scroll in the bowl and cover it wiht very hot water. Bring the bowl and all the other supplies into your child’s room. Be certain there are no drafts in the room.
3. Place the large bath towel open on a pillow, take off the child’s shirt, and liberally apply the salve or petroleum jelly onto the nipples to protect them from getting blistered or burned.
4. Thoroughly wring the water out of the mustard filled towel when it is cool enough to be handled. Unroll the mustard bandage to the folded edge. With teh folded edge at the bottom, place against the child’s chest and as far aroudn the back as it will reach. The child should quickly lie back on the bath towel, which you then wrap over the plaster. Cover the child with blankets.
5. To prevent burns, remove the plaster immediately when the child says it feels hot or is stinging. This may be after only a few minutes. After removing the plaster, wash the area with the damp washcloth and cover the child with blankets to prevent chill. Never leave the plaster on a child under the age of eight for more than 5 minutes. Adults can tolerate it for a maximum of 20 minutes. Do not repeat more than twice a day for two days, and discontinue if the area becomes red. Never leave a child unattended while the plaster is on.

Okay….so try it out and please, please, please…tell me how it goes!

Ref: Romm, Aviva Jill (2003) Naturally Healthy Babies and Children: A Commonsense Guide to Herbal Remedies, Nutrition, and HealthNaturally Healthy Babies and Children: A commonsense guide to Herbal Remedies, Nutrition, and Health. Ten Speed Press: Berkeley.


Winter Wonderland Etsy Shop S A L E

January 13, 2010
"devotional" by Skoonberg on Etsy

"devotional" by Skoonberg on Etsy

This is a SECRET SALE for my loyal blog readers and Facebook fans (or anyone who happens to drop by) for my Etsy store, Lilith’s Apothecary!! I am getting ready for a new year, including new products and an ever more refined facial care line. In the meantime, you can get some oldies but goodies on sale — and perhaps for the last time, as some of these products will not be returning. They are wonderful items using the best quality ingredients available, but anyone in the Bath & Body Care business will tell you, quite simply, I offer Too Many Products! Oh well, I view my business more as a service to you than as a corporate-headed profit making endeavor. Be aware that each sale price below is only good  while supplies last, so order soon to get your special deal!

The savings below are between $1-5 off the regular price, which really adds up!
So my SECRET WINTER SALE includes the following:

cleansing porta bidet My fabulous Cleansing Porta Bidet (a product I don’t think I could personally do without) for cleansing refreshment in the boudoir. This is one of those golden products that has so many uses. Be creative! Also ideal as a Post Partum Sitz Spritz.
2 oz @ only $4
4 oz @ only $7

cleansing elixir Balancing Cleansing Elixir for Normal to Oily Skin ~ the perfect all-purpose cleanser for those who want to balance oil production, combat acne, and use a product that both gently cleans and tonifies skin. I’ve been using these elixirs for years with fantastic results. You’ll never get such high levels of quality ingredients (read: no “fillers”) anywhere commercially. This size is perfect for trial use or travel.
2 oz @ $4

Dead Sea Clay Facial Mask An amazing product if you really want results :: the ever popular Dead Sea Clay Facial mask does quick work of problem skin — or even just oilier types — by deep cleansing, detoxifying, and actually working to achieve balance. This product is wonderful when used at least once a month up to once a week.
4 oz $11 (that’s $5 off!!!)

Calendula and Milk Facial Mask Calendula and Milk Facial Mask ~ Perfect for those sensitive skin types who are afraid to try anything on their faces. Don’t fear! You too can get the deep cleansing, skin revitalizing effects of a clay facial mask but in a way that is non-drying, non-irritating, and even provides gentle moisturization and healing. A lovely, smooth and glowy mask that I’ve always thought of as “the nectar of the gods”.
4 oz @ $11 (that’s $5 off!!!)

Cocoa Butter Body Balm My luscious Cocoa Butter Body & Belly Balm :: this is a popular product that many would never choose to do without. Wonderful as a belly balm for new mothers or as a fabulous skin protectant and deep moisturizer for all, including babies and children. It’s unscented for the most sensitive skin types, but contains a high level of natural cocoa butter that imparts a delicious scent all its own!
2 oz @ only $6
4 oz @ only $11

Salt Scrub / Body Polish Bright, refreshing, and winter-moisturizing Lemon Mandarin Body Polish for glowy skin. Awesome for revitalizing dull, winter dry skin and adding an extra layer of scented moisture!8 oz @ only $8 (some stores charge even $24 for such a product!)

Salt Scrub / Body Polish Smoldering, sexy and luxurious Osiris body polish ~ one of my most popular unisex scents with hints of cedarwood, vanilla, and subtle spice.
8 oz @ only $8

Salt Scrub / Body Polish Spicy, revitalizing, and zesty Spiral Dance Body Polish ~ a fabulous scent for all of you who adore spicy scents, including cassia, clove, and even hints of juicy tangerine.
8 oz for $8

Lemon Mandarin Shaving Soap Need something bright, refreshing and wonderfully sudsy? Try my Lemon Mandarin shaving soap. It’s made of pure, high quality glycerin for a bath soap that is very large, scented only with 100% natural citrus essential oils, and certainly not drying whatsoever. You’ll love it!
1 generous bar $4

Liquid Castille Soap Pure natural goodness for a hand soap, shower soap, or any other purpose needed. This organic liquid castille soap has a lovely texture and lather yet remains non-drying and safe for all skin types. This 8 oz, cobalt blue glass bottle of soap is unscented (great for sensitive skin, including babies) and fully re-usable.

 8 oz @ $6.50

 

TO GET YOUR SALE PRICE:
When you check-out on ETSY, type in “WINTERSALE” in the message to seller box and I’ll refund your savings via paypal refund right away! Please also note whether you heard about the sale via FB or my blog. If you want to pay by other means, just ask me to send you a new invoice. Thanks for joining me in this Winter fun, and of course, I love hearing from you any time with product suggestions, requests, ideas, or anything else that strikes your fancy. Happy 2010!


Holy Basil: the Divine herb for 2010

January 7, 2010
Tulsi, or Holy Basil

Tulsi / Holy Basil

Ocimum sanctum. The very name seems hallowed and sacred somehow., don’t you think? Well, Tulsi, or Holy Basil, gets my vote for the numero uno herb for 2010. After 2009, we all need it! But you judge for yourself.

From the Lamiaceae family, and called Tulsi (Hindi), surasa (Sanskrit), and sacred or holy basil, this wonderful herb has so much to offer us. A prized medicinal in Ayurveda, the 5,000 year old traditional medical system of India, we are all fortunate that holy basil has now found its way into the Western herbal reperatoire. And how can it be ignored? It’s an adaptogen, antibacterial, antidepressant, antioxidant, antiviral, carminative, diuretic, expectorant, galactagogue (promotes the flow of mother’s milk), and immunomodulator. But those are scientific terms to describe what Ayurveda has been attesting for perhaps 3,000 years: namely that this herb is a rasayana, a herb that nourishes a person’s growth to perfect health and promotes long life.

Tulsi’s uses in Ayurvedic history are myriad. Sacred to the Hindu god, Vishnu, holy basil is used in morning prayers in India to insure personal health, spiritual purity, and family well-being. Beads made from the tightly rolled plant stems are used in meditation for clarity and protection. The daily use of this herb is thought to support the balance of chakras (energy centers) of the body. It is thought to possess sattva (energy of purity) and as being capable of bringing on goodness, virtue, and joy in humans.

Holy Basil From Indian Medicinal Plants by B.D. Basu, 1918

From Indian Medicinal Plants by B.D. Basu, 1918

In terms of application to bodily disharmony or dis-ease, holy basil has many uses, including for nasal congestion, as an expectorant for bronchial infections, for upset stomach, for digestive issues, for soothing the urinary tract when urination is difficult and painful, and even to lower malarial fevers. Today this versatile plant is primarily seen as an adaptogen with antioxidant, neuroprotective, stress reducing, and radioprotective effects. It has also been shown to lower blood sugar levels, and can be a useful adjunct therapy for a diabetic. One of the primary reasons why I love the herb are for its stress reducing, anti-depressive effects. Clinical studies have shown significant anti-stress activity when the herb is taken as an alcohol extract, as it seems to prevent increased corticosterone levels that indicate elevated stress.

Holy Basil is used to enhance cerebral circulation and memory, even to help alleviate the “mental fog” caused by chronic cannabis smoking. David Winston also advocates the use of Holy Basil in situations of ‘stagnant depression’, a classification of depression that he coined to describe a type of situational depression. As he describes it, “In this case, some type of traumatic event occurred in a person’s life, and because he is unable to move on, his live comes to revolve around the trauma. In addition to therapy, herbs such as holy basil, damiana, rosemary, and lavender are especially useful for treating this condition” (Winston & Maimes 2007).

Tulsi is an adaptogen that helps the body alleviate stress, but certainly at the time of a traumatic event, and will also help lift spirits, provide clarity when it is most needed, and hopefully help prevent the formation of the stagnant depression as described above. There’s no question that in simplest terms, an herbal tea made with holy basil, rose petals, lavender, and perhaps a few other nutritive herbs would be a wonderful blend for someone recovering from loss. For long term therapeutic use, however, tincture form is probably preferred.

Holy Basil

Holy Basil

Tincture: 40-100 drops 3 x a day
Tea: Add 1 tsp dried leaf to 8 oz hot water, steep, covered, 5-10 min. Take 4 oz up to 3 x a day.
Safety Issues: There have been contradictory animal studies showing that holy basil might be toxic to embryos. Until conclusive information exists, avoid using it during pregnancy. Holy Basil is also reported to have an antifertility effect and should be avoided if a woman is trying to get pregnant. It is perfect for after birth, however, as it helps increase milk production.
Drug Interactions: Preliminary studies indicate that holy basil might enhance CYP-450 activity, thus speeding up the elimination of some medications.

I prefer making a tincture from the fresh herb, which I purchase from Pacific Botanicals, an organic herb farm in Oregon. You can buy the dried herb from Pacific Botanicals, Mountain Rose Herbs, and other reputable companies. However, make sure the herb is green and aromatic, whether dried or fresh. You can purchase the tincture from me via Etsy or from Herbalist & Alchemist.

REF: Winston, David and Steven Maimes (2007) Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press


How to make a Salt Scrub!

January 7, 2010

Okay, you can’t miss this! AroundPhilly.com sent a lovely journalist to my Port Richmond (Philly) home to interview me about how to make a salt/sugar scrub or body polish in the simplest terms possible. Of course I do have an earlier post on the subject, but it’s oh-so-much more fun to watch a video. Please make a comment and make me happy to have so many friends ;-)


Herbal Remedies Tip #8 – Herbal Hangover Relief

January 7, 2010

You might have needed this post most on New Year’s Day (though I actually went to bed at 11:50 if that tells you how exciting the eve of 2010 was for me this year), but hey – better late than never. Now, my love of nutrition and care of the body prompts me to admonish, “look now, people – metabolic toxins (i.e. alcohol) is not good for the body, and you know it!”, but let’s be fair. There are times when I get into a really good bottle of wine and can’t be stopped. I also lived in Ireland off and on for at least a year and a half, so I have sympathy for the human experience of the fabled hangover.

Hangovers, as most know, feel like a combination of headache, sometimes nausea, fuzzy head, maybe a bit of depression, certainly a lot of lethargy. Most of these are connected to an ‘overloaded’ liver, the organ responsible for processing the metabolic toxins from alcohol. Helping a hangover usually includes helping your liver. Bitter herbs stimulate the liver to release bile, aiding digestion and helping to detoxify the poor, overtaxed organ. You might try drinking some water with freshly squeezed lemon before bed and when you wake up in the morning to help the liver.

Morning-After Tea (no, not morning after *that*, just morning after lots of drink
1 part Vervain (bitter herb)
1 part Lavender (relaxing, calming, aids digesting, analgesic (pain relief)
1/2 part white willow bark (analgesic w/ similar compounds to asprin)
1/2 part burdock root (bitter root, liver tonic, nutritive)
* each “part” can be a tsp or 1 oz depending on how much of a blend you want to make. Try it as a cup first, though
Add 1 pint (2.5 cups) boiling water to a 2 tsp and steep (covered!) for a minimum of 10 min. Strain and sweeten with honey and/or add lemon if desired. Sip throughout the day until you start to feel better. It is a little bitter, but hey – you did it to your liver, after all, and this is what you need now!


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